Second Time’s a Charm – Romantic Script for Mature Actors

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When Steve calls to Abby to wait for him outside the movies that all four of them are going to (Steve and his wife Peggy and Abby and her husband Phil), and then confesses his undying love to her, Abby couldn’t be more suprised. The four of them have been friends for years and they have kids and grandkids as well. True, there has always been an undercurrent of rivalry between Steve and Phil, but until now, Abby had no idea why.  Then Steve demands, no, begs for a kiss and won’t let up.  Would one little peck on the cheek do any harm?

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romantic script for mature actors

SECOND TIME’S A CHARM – ROMANTIC SCRIPT FOR MATURE ACTORS

When Steve calls to Abby to wait for him outside the movies that all four of them are going to (Steve and his wife Peggy and Abby and her husband Phil), and then confesses his undying love to her, Abby couldn’t be more suprised. The four of them have been friends for years and they have kids and grandkids as well. True, there has always been an undercurrent of rivalry between Steve and Phil, but until now, Abby had no idea why.  Then Steve demands, no, begs for a kiss and won’t let up.  Would one little peck on the cheek do any harm? A romantic script for mature actors.

This play is a comedy about two couples who are friends. The two husbands, Phil and Steve, are rivals. One unbeknownst to the other, has an agenda which is central to the heart of this play. Peggy, who is married to Steve, naively thinks he is loyal and puts him on a pedestal. During the play, we shall see how Phil’s wife Abby, discovers that relationships are not all what they seem to be

PRODUCTION HISTORY

‘SECOND TIME’S A CHARM’ was first produced in Boca Raton, Florida to a warm reception.

Other plays by American playwright Stanley Dyrector

A Walk in the Park – Short play for Seniors

Author: Stanley Dyrector

Type: One act play

Genre: Romantic Script for Mature Actors

Cast: 2M 2F

Ages of the actors: Over sixty

Suitable for: All ages to watch and middle aged to mature actors to perform

Length: Forty minutes

Set: Outside on the road and inside a cinema

Level of difficulty: 7/10 – quite wordy but great for play readings

Read a Sample of the Script

Copyright © September 2021 Stanley Dyrector

Contact Off The Wall Plays with any queries about Second Time’s a Charm

Like this play? Others like it:

On the Rebound – romantic play for over sixties
A Love, never forgotten – humorous drama for older actors
X’s and O’s – short comedy senior comedy skit

SECOND TIME’S A CHARM – ROMANTIC SCRIPT FOR MATURE ACTORS

REVIEW:

Second Time’s A Charm: By Stanley Dyrector

JUST REVIEWS BY: GABINA aka FRAN LEWIS

Gimme a little kiss, will ‘ya’, huh?
What are you gonna miss, will ya, huh?

Steve and Abby have been friends for a long time, and as the scene opens, you meet them after dropping off their respective spouses in front of a movie theater waiting in line. Steve and Abby banter back and forth about an old relationship and old feelings, as all Steve wants is one little Kiss from Abby: Will ya huh? Well things get heated and the conversation gets interesting as both plead their cases; him to get what he wants, and Abby for why thats not going to happen.

Remembering a dance from over 35 years ago, brings to light a song titled: Brand Newby the Stylistics. Steve professes his feelings for Abby and she tells him he is ridiculous and were seniors. To people over 50, its never too late to indulge and never think that your libido is dead! The conversation gets personal, she reminds them that they are married but attracted to each other in different ways. Steves behavior is like a teen who has fallen for someone for the first time and Abby keeps reminding him that hes married to Peggy. The banter continues and then he explains how they can call it even. Its hilarious.


As Abby reminds Steve of her feelings for Phil, and then adds in her kids and grandkids, Steve explains in one simple line that I can picture either Jack Lemmon or Cary Grant saying, if they were to play the part, Lady, you want a kiss, you need love, You need affection. You gotta read it to believe it yourself!

When Phils panicking at the movie theater that he cant find Abby, the real fun begins. Peggy and Phil now take center stage. The dialogue revolves around where Abby might have been, breaking the law to use his handicap spot and his bigotry. Phil, played by Ed Asner, as no one else except the original Archie Bunker could, portrays the perfect bigot, an opinionated, hardheaded man who has something to say, just about anyone and anything. He is hard of hearing, so sometimes what he hears is not what is said. The discussion centers around religion, football teams, boxing champs, friends that they find annoying, Phils opinion of them, grandchildren and of course the most important part of any evening after the movie: WHERE TO EAT. This sparks a hysterical discussion. But first, each one talks about their jobs, miscalculations, mistakes that Peggy catches when shopping, and then Phil chimes in out of nowhere that he wants to eat at Steinbergs Dairy Restaurant. But, since, it is the Sabbath, well, poor Phil picks another one but not before he tells everyone to keep it quiet. The enemy is lurking, while staring at those waiting in line with them for the movie, he points out those he feels are bigots or even a Scientologist. But things get out of hand when they talk about restaurants. I can see and hear Archie saying that to Edith, Gloria and Meathead. Phils paranoia shines through things. Added in we have Roosevelt, the Marshall Plan and finally the advantages of being a senior when dining out! But, the heart of the discussion goes to The Shmarnegie Deli whose quality of food had slipped as Phil says: Doesnt got the crispy crunchy rye bread they used to have anymore. Steves comments only egg him on and he adds his own take comparing this atrocity to Brutus killing Caesar. But, the rest you have to read for yourself as the discussion wavers in different directions from who eats at Plotker’s, to insults about each others careers. Steve and Abby are alone once more. He picks up where he left off. Banter, questions, push comes to shove and then Steve finds himself presenting his case to Abby as if he were on the stand trying to convince her that hes telling the truth. So, does she go along with what he wants? What about Phil and Peggy? Why does Steve feel Peggy doesnt need him even though you know she does? Gimme a little kiss, will ‘ya’, huh?” Will she give it right back to him or will he finally take no for an answer? Only author, screenwriter, actor and writer Stanley Dyrector can deliver a play so filled with humor, sarcasm, and true to life, and tests the loyalty, friendship and sanctity of marriage and proves: YOU ARE NEVER TOO OLD FOR L O V E.

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1 review for Second Time’s a Charm – Romantic Script for Mature Actors

  1. Demmer Dewan (verified owner)

    Second Time’s A Charm: By Stanley Dyrector

    JUST REVIEWS BY: GABINA aka FRAN LEWIS

    “Gimme a little kiss, will ‘ya’, huh?
    What are you gonna miss, will ya, huh?…

    Steve and Abby have been friends for a long time, and as the scene opens, you meet them after dropping off their respective spouses in front of a movie theater waiting in line. Steve and Abby banter back and forth about an old relationship and old feelings, as all Steve wants is one little Kiss from Abby: “Will ya huh?” Well things get heated and the conversation gets interesting as both plead their cases; him to get what he wants, and Abby for why “that’s not going to happen”.

    Remembering a dance from over 35 years ago, brings to light a song titled: ‘Brand New’ by the Stylistics. Steve professes his feelings for Abby and she tells him he is “ridiculous” and “we’re seniors”. To people over 50, it’s never too late to indulge and never think that your libido is dead! The conversation gets personal, she reminds them that they are married but attracted to each other in different ways. Steve’s behavior is like a teen who has fallen for someone for the first time and Abby keeps reminding him that he’s married to Peggy. The banter continues and then he explains how they can call it even. It’s hilarious.

    As Abby reminds Steve of her feelings for Phil, and then adds in her kids and grandkids, Steve explains in one simple line that I can picture either Jack Lemmon or Cary Grant saying, if they were to play the part, “Lady, you want a kiss, you need love, You need affection.” You gotta read it to believe it yourself!

    When Phil’s panicking at the movie theater that he can’t find Abby, the real fun begins. Peggy and Phil now take center stage. The dialogue revolves around where Abby might have been, breaking the law to use his handicap spot and his bigotry. Phil, played by Ed Asner, as no one else except the original Archie Bunker could, portrays the perfect bigot, an opinionated, hardheaded man who has something to say, just about anyone and anything. He is hard of hearing, so sometimes what he hears is not what is said. The discussion centers around religion, football teams, boxing champs, friends that they find annoying, Phil’s opinion of them, grandchildren and of course the most important part of any evening after the movie: WHERE TO EAT. This sparks a hysterical discussion. But first, each one talks about their jobs, miscalculations, mistakes that Peggy catches when shopping, and then Phil chimes in out of nowhere that he wants to eat at Steinberg’s Dairy Restaurant. But, since, it is the Sabbath, well, poor Phil picks another one but not before he tells everyone to keep it quiet. The enemy is lurking, while staring at those waiting in line with them for the movie, he points out those he feels are bigots or even a Scientologist. But things get out of hand when they talk about restaurants. I can see and hear Archie saying that to Edith, Gloria and Meathead. Phil’s paranoia shines through things. Added in we have Roosevelt, the Marshall Plan and finally the advantages of being a senior when dining out! But, the heart of the discussion goes to The Shmarnegie Deli whose quality of food had slipped as Phil says: “Doesn’t got the crispy crunchy rye bread they used to have anymore.” Steve’s comments only egg him on and he adds his own take comparing this atrocity to Brutus killing Caesar. But, the rest you have to read for yourself as the discussion wavers in different directions from who eats at Plotker’s, to insults about each other’s careers. Steve and Abby are alone once more. He picks up where he left off. Banter, questions, push comes to shove and then Steve finds himself presenting his case to Abby as if he were on the stand trying to convince her that he’s telling the truth. So, does she go along with what he wants? What about Phil and Peggy? Why does Steve feel Peggy doesn’t need him even though you know she does? “Gimme a little kiss, will ‘ya’, huh?” Will she give it right back to him or will he finally take no for an answer? Only author, screenwriter, actor and writer Stanley Dyrector can deliver a play so filled with humor, sarcasm, and true to life, and tests the loyalty, friendship and sanctity of marriage and proves: YOU ARE NEVER TOO OLD FOR L O V E.

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